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Absolute Return Partners does not offer investment advice to private investors (Retail Clients as defined by the UK Financial Conduct Authority). All such investors are advised to contact Quartet Investment Managers on +44 20 8939 2920 or visit quartet-im.com.

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McDonald’s is a very good indicator of the global economy. If McDonald’s doesn’t increase its sales, it tells you that the monetary policies have largely failed in the sense that prices are going up more than disposable income, and so people have less purchasing power.
Marc Faber

Our long-term investment megatrends

The Rising Gap between Rich and Poor

Whilst the wealthiest 1% are getting wealthier and wealthier, exactly the opposite is happening to the bottom 90%. This has resulted in a growing number of frictions in society and a rise in populism. When so many people feel that life is not as good as it once was, something will have to change, they think, even if they don’t always fully understand what it is more precisely that must change.

This has changed politics profoundly in many countries, as the populist amongst the political elite don’t say what people need to hear but rather what they want to hear. It reminds us of the last big rise in populism which occurred in the dark days of the 1930s and ultimately led to World War II.

In terms of the financial impact, populists are almost always big spenders of public money. A rise in populism could therefore lead to rising inflation over time.